Services

Consistent dental care and hygiene are important to keeping your smile bright and clean. Our staff can help with anything from routine cleanings to cosmetic treatments. We offer a wide range of services to meet your individual dental needs.

Services we offer include:

Dental bonding is a cosmetic dental procedure in which a tooth-colored resin material is applied and bonded to existing teeth. Bonding is most often used for cosmetic purposes, but it can also be used to close spaces between teeth, to make teeth look longer, or to change the shape or color of teeth. Dental bonding can even sometimes be used as an alternative to metal fillings, or to protect a portion of the tooth’s root that has been exposed because of gum recession.

The dental bonding procedure typically takes between 30 minutes and one hour to complete. First, your dentist will determine the match the resin to your original tooth color so it appears completely natural. Then, using microabrasion technology, your dentist will lightly scuff the surface of the tooth. This is done so that the bonding material will adhere to the enamel. After molding the bonding material onto the tooth and securing it in place, your dentist will gently clean and shine the area to ensure a natural finish.

With proper upkeep, dental bonding can last for many years. Proper upkeep includes brushing at least twice a day, flossing at least once a day, and maintaining a healthy diet.

Used mostly in restorative dental procedures, porcelain crowns and bridges play a key role in keeping your mouth functioning properly after a tooth is lost or removed. Unlike removable devices like dentures, crowns and bridges are cemented place—but they are not permanent like dental implants. Crowns and bridges are typically used to fix an existing dental issue, but they can also be used to prevent future issues.

Crowns are most often used to help strengthen a tooth when there isn’t enough tooth remaining to hold the filling in place. Crowns are also used to protect weak teeth from breaking, cover dental implants, and restore an already broken tooth. Your dentist may also recommend dental crowns as a way to hide teeth that are discolored or misshaped. Today crowns are typically made from porcelain, ceramic or some type of resin—though they can also be made from gold alloy or nickel.

Also known as a fixed partial denture, dental bridges are used to literally bridge the gap created by one or more missing teeth. A typical dental bridge is comprised of one or more artificial teeth that are held in place by two dental crowns. When you lose a tooth, the bridges attached to surrounding teeth for support and fill in the void with artificial teeth. Dental bridges, while temporary, help keep smiles functioning normally after a tooth is lost or removed.

Dental implants are the only permanent solution available to replace a missing tooth. It doesn’t matter whether you’ve lost a tooth due to decay, trauma or overcrowding, it’s important to visit your dentist immediately. Because teeth support each other, it only takes one missing tooth to cause the surrounding teeth to shift. When this happens, chewing often becomes difficult and speech patterns can become impaired.

Widely considered to be the most durable and functional tooth replacement option available, dental implants are becoming the go-to procedure to fill the space left by a missing tooth. That’s because the long-term consequences of tooth loss can be serious. Large voids between teeth eventually become difficult to clean, which is why tooth decay and periodontal, or gum, the disease often follows tooth loss. While some turn to temporary solutions—such as dental bridges or removable dentures—patients who want a permanent solution look to dental implants.

Receiving a dental implant is a surgical procedure—an artificial tooth root is implanted into the jawbone, which provides a permanent base for a fixed crown. After the artificial root is placed in the jawbone, the two bonds to one another through a process is known as osseointegration. This usually takes between two to six months, during which time you’ll be fitted with a temporary crown so you can maintain normal daily activities. Once the implant is secure in the jawbone, a permanent crown will be cemented in place.

Dental sealants are an effective preventive dental procedure used to protect teeth from cavities and decay. They are essentially plastic coatings that are painted on the chewing surface of the teeth to protect teeth from decay. While sealants are most often used in children—usually applied to the baby molars—adults can benefit from dental sealants, too. This is especially true if they suffer from pits or fissures as they create hard-to-brush areas in between teeth.

The application of dental sealants is quick and completely non-invasive—they can be applied in just one visit. Your dentist will start by performing an initial cleaning and evaluation. He or she will then apply the plastic coatings one tooth at a time. The sealants flow into the grooves of the tooth and either hardens on its own, or is assisted with a special light source.

Once the sealants have hardened, the teeth are completely protected from bacteria. The sealant also acts as a barrier to protect enamel from outside factors such as plaque or acids. Sealants can last for several years before reapplication is considered. As long as the sealant remains intact, the tooth surface is protected from decay—sealants have proven to be very durable.

Dental X-rays—also called radiographs—are a widely-used preventive and diagnostic tool that your dentist uses to locate damage and disease that isn’t visible to the naked eye. X-ray procedures are typically performed yearly during your annual cleaning appointments. Receiving regular x-rays helps your dentist monitor and track the progress of your oral health.

There are several types of dental x-rays, each capturing a slightly different view or angle of the affected area. The two most common forms of dental x-rays include intraoral—meaning the x-ray is filmed inside the mouth—and extraoral—meaning the x-ray is filmed outside the mouth. The most common form of digital radiography in dentistry is intraoral x-rays. Some examples of this technology include:

• Bitewing: This type of x-ray offers a visual of both the lower and upper teeth. They are used to help you dentist locate decay between teeth.

• Occlusal: These x-rays create a clear view of the floor of the mouth, which shows your dentist the bite of the upper and lower jaw.

• Periapical: This detailed x-ray provides a view of the entire tooth, from the crown to the bone that supports it.

• Panoramic: Showing an image of the teeth, jaws, nasal area, sinuses and joints, this type of x-ray is one of the most advanced imaging options available.

These x-rays are typically performed in the office of a dentist or dental specialist. Special precautions are taken—such as wearing a lead-vest to protect against low levels of radiation—and your entire procedure is monitored by a dental professional.

When it comes to minimizing the risk of broken teeth or injuries to the lips, tongue, face or jaw, custom mouth guards are the most effective option available. With so many over-the-counter and boil and bite mouth guards readily available, it can be difficult to find a something that is both comfortable and safe. That’s why dentists offer custom-fitted mouth guards. These protective appliances provide the most comfort and protection because they are created specifically for you.

Custom-fitted, professionally-made mouth guards are made from molds of your own teeth. Your dentist will make an impression of your teeth and the mouth guard is created by a dental technician. In addition to being more comfortable than store-bought options, custom mouth guards are also more durable because they are made of stronger materials. Custom mouth guards also offer more protection than their stock or boil-and-bite counterparts that only cover the top row of teeth—custom mouth guards are designed to cover and protect each individual tooth.

Wearing a mouth guard is an important precaution for athletes of all ages and abilities, helping to protect against chipped or broken teeth, root and bone damage, and tooth loss. In addition to protecting teeth, mouth guards have proven effective in preventing serious injuries like jaw fractures, neck injuries, and concussions.

Periodontal disease—also known as gum disease—is a bacterial growth that is caused by plaque and tartar build up. If left untreated, gum disease ultimately destroys the tissues and bones that support teeth. When this occurs, teeth become loose and ultimately need to be removed. While plaque and tartar are the primary causes of gum disease, other contributing factors include tobacco use, clenching or grinding teeth, and genetics.

There are two main types of gum disease: gingivitis and periodontitis. Swollen and bleeding gums are early signs of periodontal disease that many people ignore. Gingivitis usually appears during the beginning stages of periodontal disease and often goes unnoticed—unless it’s identified by a dental professional. Untreated gingivitis eventually leads to periodontitis, which breaks down the bones and tissues that support the teeth.

Treating periodontal disease depends on the type and severity of condition. If your dentist is able to catch the condition early enough, there are steps that can be taken to remove plaque through procedures like scaling and root planing. Other conservative, non-invasive approaches include prescribing medications and oral mouth rinses to kill bacteria in the mouth. In more serious cases, surgery or grafting procedures may be required to stop periodontal disease from spreading.

A root canal procedure is performed when the soft tissue—also known as the pulp—inside of the tooth becomes inflamed or infected. When the pulp becomes infected, it is usually caused by an untreated deep cavity or tooth fracture. Damaged or dead pulp causes blood flow and cellular activity to flow towards the infected area, which ultimately causes pain. Most patients in need of a root canal experience pain when biting down, chewing, and/or ingesting hot or cold foods and drinks.

The goal of a root canal procedure is to repair and save a tooth that is badly decayed—this is a much better alternative than extracting the tooth. Tooth extractions may seem like a simpler solution on paper, but the void left behind by the extracted tooth needs to be filled otherwise teeth can shift. It is much easier to save an existing tooth than it is to add a dental implant or bridge.

During a root canal procedure, your dentist will save the dead or damaged pulp in the tooth by cleaning out the diseased pulp and reshaping the canal. He or she will then fill the canal with a substance called gutta-percha to prevent recontamination of the tooth. Finally, they will seal the tooth and you can return to normal chewing activities almost immediately following the procedure. Depending on the severity of your condition, most root canals can be performed in one office-visit.

With so many teeth whitening options available—both over-the-counter and professional—it can be difficult to determine which option is best for your teeth. While in-office whitening systems are effective, take-home teeth whitening is least aggressive.

Teeth typically become discolored through extrinsic factors like coffee, wine, or smoking—or through intrinsic factors like medications, or excessive fluoride use. Although some people experience discoloration simply due to aging.

Before your whitening procedure begins, your dentist will complete initial prep work, including a thorough cleaning of your teeth and gums. Next, he or she will apply the whitening solution to any exposed surfaces. Depending on the whitening system being utilized, a light source may be used to enhance the whitening gel.

We make take-home teeth whitening trays, and Opalescence whitening gel tubes will be included in the package.

•Opalescence: Using high-concentrated peroxide gel, this whitening technique offers brighter, whiter teeth in about two weeks.

Temporomandibular joint disorder—also called TMJ or TMD—describes a group of conditions that affect the muscles in your jaw. The temporomandibular joint is the main cause of pain in these cases. These joints connect the lower jaw (mandible) to the skull. Located on each side of your head, these joints work together so you can do simple, everyday things like chewing your food, speaking to a friend or swallowing your favorite drink.

TMJ disorders often cause tenderness in the jaw, facial pain and difficulty moving the joint. You may also notice a clicking, grating, and/or popping noise when you move your jaw. Others may experience lockjaw or difficulty opening their mouth all the way.

While there is no known cause, TMJ affects millions of Americans. Trauma to the jaw or face usually plays a role in the development of this condition, but these conditions are also believed to contribute to the development of TMJ:

• Osteoarthritis: Over time, joints become prone to arthritis—this is no different for the temporomandibular joints.

• Rheumatoid arthritis: Inflammation in the temporomandibular joints can cause cartilage to break down, and joints become susceptible to erosion.

• Bruxism: Teeth grinding can cause teeth to wear down and become misaligned, causing chewing muscles to change.

• Clenching: Stress is often associated with clenching, which can cause facial pain around the temporomandibular joints.

Dental veneers are the perfect cosmetic dental solution for patients who want to completely redesign their smile without orthodontics or invasive procedures. Veneers are thin shells made from of porcelain or resin composite materials that are custom-made to cover the front side of your teeth. Veneers work by covering up unsightly stains or chips, while also hiding uneven teeth, worn down teeth, and/or abnormally spaced teeth.

Receiving dental veneers is usually a multi-step process that involves at least three office-visits to complete. During the initial consultation, your dentist will perform a full examination and evaluate your teeth to ensure you are a candidate for veneers. On your next visit, he or she will begin the process by removing approximately ½ millimeter of enamel from the tooth surface—this is roughly the same thickness of the veneer. Then your dentist will take an impression of your teeth, which is used to create the veneer.

Once the veneer is fabricated, it is ready to be bonded onto the tooth. Once your dentist has determined that the finished veneer’s shape and shade are correct, the veneer is ready to be bonded into place. However, before this happens, your dentist will apply a gel to the teeth in order to create a rough surface that the veneer can bond to. He or she will then apply the bonding agent and place the veneer.